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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)
army is accusing pakistan of breaking the terms of the cease-fire in the disputed region of kashmir. the pakistani army claims one of its soldiers was killed in a cross border raids by the indian army. india said pakistan fired across the border for this. >> it is evident the pakistani army continues to violate the cease-fire agreement. maybe to facilitate infiltration attempts. the attempts of the infiltrators will not succeed. >> security issues aside, pakistan has to worry about widespread poverty. the un says more than half the population barely has enough to eat, and the energy shortage is making things worse. >> he used to be able to provide for his family. not anymore. a shortage of natural gas has taken his jobs. >>, as opposed to feed my kids? if it goes on like this, i would have no choice. >> the machinery in factories now stand idle. production lines are empty for thousands of workers out of the job. the energy crisis has paralyzed production in more than 500 factories. the government says it has to meet the demand from household users, but the result is an increase in u
from across the region, including pakistan. we welcome recent steps that have been taken in at that regard and we'll look for more tangible steps because a stable and secure afghanistan is in the interest not only of the afghan people and the united states, but the entire region. and finally, we reaffirm the strategic partnership we signed last year in kabul, the partnership between two sovereign nations, deepening ties of trade and commerce, development of education, opportunities for all afghans, men and women, boys and girls. this sends a clear message to afghans and to the region, as afghans stand up they will not stand alone. the united states and the world stands with them. now, let me close by saying that this continues to be a very difficult mission. our forces continue to serve and make tremendous sacrifices every day. the afghan people make significant sacrifices every day. afghan forces still need to grow strong. we remain vigilant against insider attacks. lasting peace and security will require governments and development that delivers for the afghan people an
drastically increased the use of predator drones. 329 targeted strikes have taken place in pakistan since 2004, but the vast majority have taken place since 2009. although opposition to the president's use of drones has remained largely silent, that seems to be changing. two days ago in hawaii protesters paraded signs close to where the first family was vacationing, which read drones kill kids and is it really okay if obama does it? last week a federal judge ruled the administration did not need to disclose internal communications about the drone program. the "new york times" and the aclu had filed requests in 2011 for the legal justification of these targeted killings, including the drone strike that killed anwar al alaki, an american citizen living in yemen. the white house denied that request for purposes of national security. the judge approved the administration's right to keep that information classified, but still questioned the drone program, writing, "i can find no way around the thicket of laws and precedents that effectively allow the executive brarchg of our government to proclaim
threat to united states faces is between the mountains of pakistan and afghanistan. previouslythese are issues thate addressed. where does he think afghanistan is going to go? what did he think at this one point that it was such a vital and strategic interest? the president himself tries to address that issue. senator hagel has made a lot of statements over the years about the middle east and central asia that i think have to be addressed. it is not simply about israel and the u.s.. it is about the statements and the votes that senator hagel been made, sanctions on iran, talking with the dictatorship in syria about not signing a resolution be, asking europe to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization. votes against signaling that the i iranian revolutionary guard was a terrorist organization. all these things that suggest that his views about the middle east and the palestinian-is really conflict, brought together with those -- israeli conflict, brought together with those other statements. people often say that presidents should be given to deference to his appointees. i agr
, pakistan certainly has taken out a whole codry of leadership. what we are seeing now are people who have migrated back to other parts of the world where they came from, primarily, who are, in effect, affiliates. part of the jihadist syndicate, like maghreb uses that name. the fact is, they are terrorists, they are extremists. they have designs on overthrowing existing governments, even these new islamist governments of controlling territory. so although there has been the decimation of core al qaeda in the afghanistan/pakistan region, we do have to contend with the wannabes and affiliates going forward. >> thank you, madam. >> thank you, mr. chairman and thank you, madam secretary for being here and it's great to see you today. you have been, i think, a real and dedicated public servant for this country and your travels around the world as many here have talked about it, the million miles that you have put on and all the countries you visited and i think you've been to many countries where they've never had a secretary of state and i've seen firsthand when i've been to many of these coun
is between the mountains of pakistan and afghanistan. today, or previously, he opposed the president's surge in afghanistan. these are issues that need to be addressed. where does he think afghanistan is going to go? why did he think that afghanistan was such a vital, strategic interest and then when the president himself tries to address the issue, he does not support that position? so senator chuck hagel -- i keep putting him in o ffice -- has meant a lot of statements over the years about the middle east and central asia that i think have to be addressed. the is -- the issue that the u.s.-israel relationship was brought up produce the has to be put in context. i think the caller started down that road, which is the fact that it is not simply about israel and the u.s., it is all about the statements that senator chuck hagel made on sanctionsmade on sanctions on id talking with the dictatorship in syria about not signing a resolution or not signing on to a resolution about hezbollah and asking europe to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization. despite the fact that the killed hundre
in pakistan. the u.s. war on terror grown reliant on the unmanned vehicles that are prepared for flight an armed with the hell fire missiles. >> i believe john brennan taking over at c.i.a. will ensure that the drone program will comet. the administration has been -- and brennan particular, selling us on the fact that drones is the magic weapon. >> bret: >> reporter: president bam banal herted the drones from the predecessor. despite his criticism of bush, he has empanded the program employing agilities to authorize 300 drone strikes that killed # ,500 people. it has long strangeed relakes with pakistan and civilian who complain about the civilian casualties. >> we endeavor to redouse zillian casualties as much as possible. -- civilian casualties as much as possible. taking the fight to al-qaeda made the united states safer. >> worked to embed evidents to a strong legal frame wok. >> civil bi liberty groups. >> the u.s. government is using drones far from the battlefield to kill people who are not presenting any threat to the united states. that is the under which force used forren the
, afghanistan, and pakistan. every other country in the world, we are under the kind of contracting rules that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to mali and the drc and somalia? >> i would recommend -- there was an article in one of the newspapers that went into detail and here's how it started. for more than two decades, they required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractors for the embassies abroad. you get what you pay for. the provision started in 1990 and stayed with us. i would respectfully request that this submitee take a look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody, at least look at the high threat posts where we did it for iraq, afghanistan and pack o pakistan and the countries you are naming are countries that i would fall into that category. >> thank you very much. among the various extremist groups operating in africa today, in your view,
for the administration on several occasions. >> rose: syria, for example. >> pakistan, syria, other places. and i suspect that president obama is not going to see in senator john kerry as much of an independent operator as we saw with, say, secretary clinton who pressed very hard with bob gates for a much more muscular expansion of the surge in afghanistan. she pressed very hard for the libya intervention. and i'm -- it's not clear to me yet that secretary kerry, if he is confirmed, would necessarily press as hard as she did on those issues. he may well surprise us on that. >> rose: she has high public marks for what she did as secretary of state. among the foreign policy people, what do they look at as her principal accomplishment? >> i think that the public marks have been a little bit higher, charlie, than what you hear from within the foreign policy community. that's usually the case in these cases. certainly when she went around the world she was a star in her own right. she certainly stood for a number of women's rights issues that are near and dear to her heart. but it was interesting out of this
. the president said he had approved a covert mission inside pakistan that resulted in the death of the founder and later of al qaeda, the group that attacked us on september 11th, 2001, which led congress to pass the authorization for use of military force, which has justified the 12 years of war that have followed ever since. so the announcement that bin laden was dead on may 21st -- excuse me, on may 1st, 2010, may 1st, 2010. two days later, two days later on may 3rd, 2010, two days after that announcement, retired senator chuck hagel gave an interview to his hometown paper in lincoln, nebraska "the journal star." he told the paper it should reassure america and the world that america is still a leader, and we can and will get the job done. he said, quote, that is very important for the world to realize. more the point, though, chuck hagel then said, "well, now that we've killed osama bin laden, let's leave afghanistan." he said that the pursuit of bin laden and al qaeda was, quote, the reason we invaded afghanistan ten years ago. now that bin laden was dead, the president he said has to, qu
through the middle east around pakistan and afghanistan. i was hoping you might want to share important lessons that you learned from the time you spent in this post and enlighten us on what congress can do to help respond and get in front of the threats as you move forward. related to that, if i may, assuming that you are goingbe to say what you said a couple of times of increasing engagement at the ground level, how do we do that in areas that are unstable? where we need to depend on local governments or local security forces? that quite frankly we have seen don't have the ability to provide type of security that our diplomats will demand? >> congressman, wonderful to see you here. i thank you for your interest to looking in to the future. let me make a couple of point points. we have a lot of tools that we don't use as well as we should. we advocated the broadcasting arena in tv and radio considered old fashioned media are still very important in the ungoverned areas and difficult places we are trying to do business. i think we have to get our act together. i hope we pay attention to
through the middle east. and iran, pakistan, afghanistan. as you close on your tenure, i was wondering if you might be willing to share some important lessons learned from the time you spent in this post. and enlighten us as to what congress can do to help respond and even get in front of these threats as we move forward. and related to that if i may, assuming that you're going to say what you've said a couple of times about increased engagement at the ground level, how do we do that in areas that are unstable? where we need to depend on local governments or local security forces that we've frankly seen don't have the ability to provide the type of security that our diplomats are going to demand. >> well, congressman, it's wonderful to see you here. and i thank you for your interest in looking sort of into the future. let me just make a couple of points. first, we have a lot of tools we don't use as well as we should. i think we've abdicated the broadcasting arena where both in tv and radio which are considered kind of old fashioned media are still very important in a lot of these diff
and the mideast around pakistan and afghanistan, as you quote on your -- close on your tenure i wondered if you'd share some important lessons learned from the time you spent in this post and enlighten us as to what congress can do to help respond and get in front of these threats as we move forward and related to that, if i may, assuming that you're going to say about increased engagement at the ground level. how do we do that in areas that are unstable where we need to depend on local government or local security forces that quite frankly we've seen don't have the ability to provide the type of security that our diplomats are going to demand? see you here. i thank you for your interest in looking sort of into the future. let me just make a couple of points. first, we have a lot of tools that we don't use as well as we should. i think we've abdicated the broadcasting arena where both in tv and radio, which are considered kind of old fashioned, media are still very important in a lot of difficult places where we're trying to do business. i think we have to get our act together. i would hope thi
. iraq, afghanistan and pakistan so every country in the world we are under the kind of contracting world that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to the drc come to somalia? >> there was an article i think in one of the newspapers today that went into some detail. basically years has started. federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local card services at its embassies abroad and there's that old saying you get what you pay for and this lowest price provision started off in 1990, but it has just stayed with us and i would respectfully request that this committee would take a hard look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody at least look at the highest post where obviously we did it for iraq and afghanistan and pakistan and the countries that you are naming our countries that i think would fall into that category.
the program perhaps in yemen, pakistan and other hot areas? >> suzanne, as you know, the principle architect, arguably, in yemen. he has traveled to yemen several times since the christmas day attempt in yemen to bring down u.s. flight over detroit. in the foundation that i work, new america foundation, in addition to cnn, we track that and we find that pakistan is going down rather dramatically, compared to 2010. it's expanding rapidly in yemen. one strike two years ago and there were probably -- at least 46 in this past year. so, he has presided over this policy. surely, it will be a topic at his nomination, whether you think of it negatively or positively. >> do you think it will have an impact by people who say this is not the way of doing things, going to war and going after terrorists? >> i doubt it, suzanne. i think there's broad support for this in general in washington and in congress. dealing most directly with the drones is satisfied in her own mind and has said publicly that the drones don't kill a lot of civilians, there's a great deal of caretaken with this. bro broadly speakin
of afghanistan and pakistan -- previously opposed the surge in afghanistan. these are issues the need to be addressed. where do we think afghanistan is going to go? why did he think at one point that afghanistan was such a strategic interest? senator hagel has made a lot of statements over the years about the middle east and central asia that i think have to be addressed. israel-u.s. relationships have to be put into context. i think the caller started them. but the fact is not simply that it is between the u.s. and israel, there are statements the senator made on the sanctions on iran. top of the dictatorship in syria. not signing on to a resolution, asking europe to designate hezbollah as a terrorist organization. on and on. the context suggests that his views about the middle east and his use about the palestinian it-is really conflict have to be brought together with those other statements to get a bigger picture of how he thinks about the middle east. i think it is rare that a nominee -- i do think that people often say the president should give deference to his and -- to his app
in afghanistan and spread to iraq and is in yemen and pakistan and other places. we tend to understand that when soldiers go to war, they die in service to our country and we're grateful that they do that. once the conflict ends, we're left with fragile states with challenging situations and poor, weak governments and that's the construct that chris stevens willingly walked into because he understood that as we see a libya or egypt or tunisia or yemen move forward, the united states has to be there. while there were mistakes made and underestimations, we can't reduce it to zero. chris stevens understood the situation in benghazi better than anyone else and decided to be there and we should be grateful for his service and his sacrifice. >> the biggest mistake was putting susan rice on that sunday morning on television with what turned out to be wrong intelligence when they didn't need to go that fast. that's probably as much the media's fault for demanding that they do that kind of thing. i think everyone is culpable here. let's take a break and we'll come back and talk about two more hot button
. the terribly difficult challenge dealing with and reducing the flow of calcium ammonium nitrate from pakistan into afghanistan which finds its way into the roadside bombs that kill our troops, known as ied's. thank you for the work. the work on behalf of women throughout the world but also women and girls particularly in afghanistan and even though we are still in the throes of responding to the challenges in syria, the great work you have done on humanitarian assistance and other elements of that strategy we have worked together on. i also want to commend the words he spoke today about not retreating when it comes to getting that balance right queen engagement and also security. both high priorities. i was struck by and i am glad you were so is this a bit on page 3 of your testimony about -- you were so pacific on page 3 of your testimony. the recommendation by the board which now has found its way into the jake now is a set of 64 specific action items. you said 85% are on track to be completed by the end of march. what if any impediments and implementation do you perceive right now and are
down drone attacks on al qaeda affiliates in pakistan, yemen, will not use other counterterrorism resources to identify, locate and detain the terrorists involved in the death of our ambassador and others in libya. this inconsistent policy may stem from the president's hasty campaign promise to shut down guantanamo bay, gitmo, prematurely transfer detention facilities in iraq and afghanistan. in doing so the president effectively ended america's ability to detain and interrogate terrorists, depriving the f.b.i., the c.i.a. and other agencies of critical opportunities to obtain information on al qaeda networks. today, as the case of benghazi suspect harzi, has demonstrated, the united states is completely reliant on the cooperation of host countries to detain on our behalf and selectively allow access to suspects. as in the case of harzi, as demonstrated, this approach is fraught with diplomatic roadblocks, costing critical time and getting information from suspects to track terrorist networks. perhaps that is why president obama so often opts to use lethal drone strikes to kill te
mission or return to pakistan? joining us now is the president of act for america, and the author bridgette gabriel. >> good morning, just to recap, let's tell malala's story again. she has been a champion for years of girls education in pakistan. she wants equal rights. she had a blog she spoke out about what was like being a young girl in the swat valley in pakistan, for all of that targeted tore the for the taliban and pulled over her school bus as she was on the way home from school and shot her in the head. miraculously, she survived, thanks to the great work of some pakistan and british doctors. she's now out of the hospital. what's the update on malala and what's next for her? >> she is out of the hospital and her father got a job in britain so her family will remain in britain, where she will be a little bit safer. they will have a little bit of security. but her life, it's going to be an uphill battle trying to protect ser he have from now on because she has become a symbol of freedom to many women in the islamic world and this is why she is he' going to remain a target a
extent pakistan is playing a role in these conversations. >> reporter: that's a good question. obviously pakistan will have to play a significant role. we're trying to get more information on that as we go forward. having been in pakistan just more than a year ago for the death of osama bin laden, the challenges that exist there are as great as any, especially given waziristan and the areas where the two countries border, but also those avenues for the u.s. to be able to receive all of the munitions that it needs and its supply lines so pakistan will clearly be critical in terms of the u.s. conversation going forward. >> steve rattner? >> so chuck, just back to guns for a second. any guesses yet on what the shape of an obama package would look like and when it would come? >> well, it seems -- first of all, they said it's going to be in the state of the union. that's number one. the second is that it would -- you know, there seems to be that they're going around -- they want to push something on the magazines. push more on this mental health check aspect. i think they're going to throw th
own, a part of china policy, a lot of pakistan policy, a lot of counterterrorism policy, was run directly out of the white house and out of the national security council. in this case, in the case of benghazi, because it got to a question of embassy security, it fell more directly on the state department. but, you know, you heard the echoes of some of those broader questions come up today when the secretary was asked, for example, well, why isn't the military -- why wasn't the military there to protect the benghazi consulate, and the answer is, it's not been a major mission of the military in the past to protect embassies. they mostly protect the classified documents. >> this wasn't an embassy, it was an intelligence listening post, that's why they didn't want a military presence, they didn't want to draw attention to it. chris cillizza, the foreign policy, in many regards, has been run out of the white house, and perhaps even more so because mcdonagh, the deputy of national security director is going to be the next chief of staff. >> right. no reason to think that will change. a
have pakistan next door. that is still where the majority of the terrorism that affects us is coming from. but i think people do understand particularly after osama bin laden was killed that we need to draw down significantly. that we need to scale back our presence in the region. because look at the end of the day we're not going to create a jeffersonian democracy in afghanistan. that's not something we even really want to do as a nation. we really want to focus more at home. >> i'm going to switch gears right now. and i'll start with joy here with regard to the talk about the president's cabinet picks this week. there's been so much discussion about that. some people have been criticizing the president for his lack of diversity. in fact, here's what congressman charlie rangel said about this on msnbc. here it is. >> it's embarrassing as hell. we've been through all this with mitt romney. we were very hard on mitt romney with his women binder. >> so overly harsh assessment by the congressman? what do you think? >> it's three people. i find it a little bit funny that we're going into
yousufzai was airlifted there after being shot in the head in october in pakistan's swat valley. today, the hospital in birmingham, england, released video and photographs of malala waving to the staff and hugging her nurses as she left on thursday. for now, she'll stay in britain with her family, and next month, she'll have skull reconstruction surgery. hundreds of thousands of palestinians rallied in gaza today in a rare show of support of the fatah movement there. the yellow flags of fatah were seen waving all over gaza in large squares, in processions, and from rooftops. it was the first such event since the rival group hamas seized power in gaza in 2007. hamas approved today's rally, and its prime minister voiced hopes for reconciling differences over how to deal with israel. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the war in syria reached another grim milestone this week. the united nations estimated that the death toll from the almost two-year long conflict has reached more than 60,000. ray suarez has our report. >> suarez: a pro-government tv
in pakistan, i'm going to go after that target. you know, i want the cooperation of the pakistanies but we're going go after that target. that created a big stir. on another occasion. >> yes, and that was the yet civil, of course. but then the second one was when he said that he was willing to sit down with hostile leaders. and that he is side a strong country doesn't hesitate to talk. and that created quite a stir. this was during the campaign. >> yes, it actually started before hillary. i mean with all-- joe biden was one of the candidates. a number of other candidates. but you know, when you look back, it was clear that he had thought through these things because they helped, you know, they an nature-- animated some of the decisions that he made later. people asked me what is the most salient quality of barack obama. and there are many. but consistency is a great-- you know, you look back at the things that he has said over the years, and there aren't a lot of mysteries about the decisions that he made. he said he would end the war in iraq. he ended it. he said if he could go after bin
that started in afghanistan, spread to iraq, and is in yemen, pakistan, other places. we tend to understand that when soldiers go to war soldiers die in the service of our country and we're ever so grateful that they do that. but once the conflict ends, we're left with fragile states with challenging situations and poor, weak governments. and that's the construct that chris stevens willily walked into because he understood that as we see a libya or an egypt or a a tunisia or a yemen move forward the united states has to be there. and while there were mistakes made, there were underestimations the of the threat posed to that temporary diplomatic facility, at the same time we can never reduce the risk to zero. >> right. >> i think we should respect the fact that chris stevens understood the situation in benghazi better than anyone else and he was the one who ultimately decided to be there and we should be grateful for his service and his sacrifice. >> the biggest mistake was putting susan rice on that sunday morning on television with what turned out to be wrong intelligence when they didn't
. in pakistan, in iraq, excuse me, in afghanistan, and yemen and elsewhere. and we do, as by necessity, rely on security professionals to implement the protocols and procedures necessary to keep our people safe and as i said in my opening statements, i have a lot of confidence in them because, you know, most of the time they get it right. but i was also engaged, and i think this is what deputy secretary burns was referring to, in the issues related to the deteriorating threat environment, particularly in libya. there were other places across the region we were also watching to try to see what we could do to support the libyan government to improve the overall stability of their country, to deal with the many militias. we have many programs and actions that we were working on. i had a number of conversations with leading libyan officials, i went to libya in october, 2011. in fact, shortly before the attack on benghazi, we approved libya for substantial funding from a joint state dod account for border security, ct capabilities and wmd efforts. so i want to just clarify there were specific ins
is captain katie petronia we intervurd her. she served in front line positions in afghanistan and pakistan, and wrote get over it. we're not all created equal. >> i found i broke down and muscle atrophy at a much faster rate and noticeable rate than my male marines. i found myself tripping constantly. my legs buckling, falling during firefights. >> reporter: this is going to be a debate here in the military among the elite units as to whether, whether women will be able to be as physically strong for some of those special operations teams in particular and some of those elite marine units. but secretary panetta and chairman of the joint chiefsmpse announcement later today and the joint chiefs are behind secretary panetta on this. bill: thank you, jennifer griffin, early with us today at the pentagon. martha? martha: pentagon spokesperson releasing this statement on the issue saying, quote, secretary panetta strongly supports these changes. he recognizes over the last decade women have contributed in unprecedented ways to the military's mission. they put their lives on the line to defend th
-old originally from pakistan who moved to the uk on a student visa and was originally arrested back in 2009 for an alleged plot to alabama a shopping center in manchester england. he was released for lack of evidence but remained on the f.b.i.'s radar. he was extradited last week when his name surfaced into an investigation on a suicide bombing attack on the new york subway system that failed to be pulled off. he is the 8th defendant to face charges in brooklyn for the failed subway plot. you may remember one of his alleged coconspirators who pled guilty back in 2010. he and others were communicating with a shado shadowy al-qaida member. they were e-mailing phrases, such as marriage. he was stopped and the plot was foiled. nasir was using the name language as zazi while communicating with this guy in pack sthapb and was part of this kpheur to commit multiple terrorist attacks and that's why the u.s. attorney in the u.s. was able tow prosecute him. that first appearance scheduled about two hours from now. jenna we'll look forward to developments on that case. thank you. jon: a big take down
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)

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